philip johnson's glass house

My interest in architecture began long before design school. It was only appropriate that I end up being taught Design History by an architect. It was back then that learned about Philip Johnson's Glass House – one of the most well known examples of modernist architecture.

I was thrilled to get an (unexpected) chance to see it this weekend in New Canaan, CT. The tours are so popular that appointments sell out very quickly each season. But I was lucky enough to acquire tickets from my cousin who wasn't able to go herself. She had tickets booked for a whole year!

It was an interesting and very informative 90 minute tour of the house and the other buildings on the property. The house was completed in 1949 and was Philip Johnson's private residence (and where he later died). Below are my photos (and annotations) from the tour. I highly recommend taking the trip up if you live/visit the NY area. It was beautiful.

The window at the visitor's center

The front gate to the property was designed by Johnson (225 sailing cables are utilized to raise and lower the large bar).

Da Monsta was originally intended to be the visitor's center. Now not being used.

window from inside Da Monsta

Eames Bertoia chairs inside the presentation room inside Da Monsta

The Glass House

A view from the exterior back

Mies van de Rohe Barcelona chairs in the living room


A view from the kitchen area


A view from the dining area

The small bed in the very open bedroom

The bathroom on the other side of the fireplace


The view of the pool from the bedroom area

I loved the cone shaped (bottom/inside) swimming pool.


A view of the Lake Pavilion from the back of the house

The entrance to the Painting Gallery


The Painting Gallery had a combined bathroom/winebar area

The rotating walls in the painting gallery allowed for changing views as needed
Frank Stella painting

Julian Schnabel painting

A fabulous silk-screen portrait of Johnson by Andy Warhol

The entrance of the Sculpture Gallery

Gorgeous light and space in the Sculpture Gallery